Skip navigation

Daily Archives: October 25th, 2009

screenshot_19

Image has nothing to do with the article,  but somehow still works.  It is a still from a series of videos called Mister Glasses.

From the article:   “Now, architects, I know you’re going through tough times. If even Lord “Moneybags” Foster is ditching a quarter of his workforce, things must be bad. I know the public don’t appreciate you. I know your job is thankless: anyone watching Grand Designs can see that only a masochist would ever consider building anything larger than a garden shed. And I know that the last thing you want to hear is criticism. But, here goes.”

Advertisements

architecture_385x18_629015a

A compelling article  from the TIMES ONLINE, discusses the current situation for architecture students in the UK, which also applies to the U.S.

From the article:  “So, what do you go into architecture for? Iain Borden, the head at Bartlett, puts much of the rise down to the Grand Designs factor. “Architecture is much more visible nowadays,” he says. “It’s on the TV. Icon projects are a factor. Students see them on adverts or on holiday. People such as Norman Foster are household names.”

Allen agrees. “We get students at 18 who all like Foster and the Guggenheim in Bilbao and Santiago Calatrava. Architecture is a bit cool. But it’s also a career, so the parents like it too. Everyone’s happy.”

sf open studios

The San Francisco Open Studios, sponsored by ARTSPAN, are a monthlong event, occuring four the four weekends of October.  The final weekend is the best one, taking place at the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, where there are over 100 artists having studios in the old naval barracks.   This is a highly recommended event.   Take a break, get out of the architectural studio and look at some art!

zh03

Not being satisfied with her status as a superstar architect, Zaha Hadid is also designing shoes for LACOSTE.  I believe this is the same company with the annoying little alligators on the shirts that all the prepschool types in the U.S. consider de rigeur.   Also take a look at Rem Koolhaas’ shoe design here.

toilet paper

Robin Williams will tell you how CRAP design can actually be made into a good one.*

She is the author of The Non-Designer’s Design Book

*  (When CRAP means Contrast, Repetition, Alignment and Proximity.)

http://www.wired.com/science/discoveries/magazine/17-01/st_3st

st_3st_f

(from the linked Wired magazine article): 

Night owls are more creative.
Artists, writers, and coders typically fire on all cylinders by crashing near dawn and awakening at the crack of noon. In one study, “evening people” almost universally slam-dunked a standardized creativity test. Their early-bird brethren struggled for passing scores.

seinfeld

George Costanza:  “Nothing is higher than architecture …..”    Link is to a Youtube video with a clip from a Seinfeld episode. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXMDRbOBMno

16729

The Bauhaus celebrates its 90th birthday (founded in 1919, dissolved in 1933) with a series of exhibitions, first in Germany, then moving to the Museum of Modern Art  in NYC.   (from the MOMA website:  ”

This survey is MoMA’s first major exhibition since 1938 on the subject of this famous and influential school of avant-garde art. Founded in 1919 and shut down by the Nazis in 1933, the Bauhaus brought together artists, architects, and designers in an extraordinary conversation about the nature of art in the age of technology. Aiming to rethink the very form of modern life, the Bauhaus became the site of a dazzling array of experiments in the visual arts that have profoundly shaped our visual world today.

The exhibition gathers over four hundred works that reflect the broad range of the school’s productions, including industrial design, furniture, architecture, graphics, photography, textiles, ceramics, theater design, painting, and sculpture, many of which have never before been exhibited in the United States. It includes not only works by the school’s famous faculty and best-known students—including Anni Albers, Josef Albers, Herbert Bayer, Marianne Brandt, Marcel Breuer, Lyonel Feininger, Walter Gropius, Vasily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, László Moholy-Nagy, Lucia Moholy, Lilly Reich, Oskar Schlemmer, and Gunta Stölzl—but also a broad range of works by innovative but less well-known students, suggesting the collective nature of ideas.”