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Category Archives: art

In this handout photo provided by photographer Gregory Holm, ...
(From YAHOO news) “In this handout photo provided by photographer Gregory Holm, architect Matthew Radune is seen holding a mockup of the Ice House Detroit project in downtown Detroit on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2009. Radune and Holm plan to freeze one of the city’s thousands of abandoned homes to draw attention to the foreclosure crisis that’s battered the Detroit area.”

ICE       At least they are doing something artistic in Detroit – although the artist is now a resident of  NYC.

sf open studios

The San Francisco Open Studios, sponsored by ARTSPAN, are a monthlong event, occuring four the four weekends of October.  The final weekend is the best one, taking place at the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, where there are over 100 artists having studios in the old naval barracks.   This is a highly recommended event.   Take a break, get out of the architectural studio and look at some art!

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The Bauhaus celebrates its 90th birthday (founded in 1919, dissolved in 1933) with a series of exhibitions, first in Germany, then moving to the Museum of Modern Art  in NYC.   (from the MOMA website:  ”

This survey is MoMA’s first major exhibition since 1938 on the subject of this famous and influential school of avant-garde art. Founded in 1919 and shut down by the Nazis in 1933, the Bauhaus brought together artists, architects, and designers in an extraordinary conversation about the nature of art in the age of technology. Aiming to rethink the very form of modern life, the Bauhaus became the site of a dazzling array of experiments in the visual arts that have profoundly shaped our visual world today.

The exhibition gathers over four hundred works that reflect the broad range of the school’s productions, including industrial design, furniture, architecture, graphics, photography, textiles, ceramics, theater design, painting, and sculpture, many of which have never before been exhibited in the United States. It includes not only works by the school’s famous faculty and best-known students—including Anni Albers, Josef Albers, Herbert Bayer, Marianne Brandt, Marcel Breuer, Lyonel Feininger, Walter Gropius, Vasily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, László Moholy-Nagy, Lucia Moholy, Lilly Reich, Oskar Schlemmer, and Gunta Stölzl—but also a broad range of works by innovative but less well-known students, suggesting the collective nature of ideas.”

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An advertisement from 1961.   This image would make a great basis for a pop art painting.    For example in this style:

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D2FX9rviEhw

These shepherds definitely have way too much time on their hands …..

This was found on William Gibson’s blog.

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http://www.supertouchart.com/2009/03/12/spainfirst-looktakashi-murakami-at-the-guggenheim-bilbao/#more-16216

As Japanese Pop Art master TAKASHI MURAKAMI’s retrospective “© Murakami” show continues on its epic world tour, the grandiose GUGGENHEIM BILBAO museum plays host to its latest and most daunting stop to date. Settling into the swooping Frank Gehry-skinned art palace, the show—fresh off its recent stop in Frankfurt, Germany—replicates its general outlay previously established at the initial MoCA LA, and Brooklyn Museum stops, but this time the artist’s epic painted and sculptural works are finally housed in a venue as aesthetically compelling as the whole of Murakami’s oeuvre.

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http://www.supertouchart.com/2009/03/11/nycstreet-lifeyoshitomo-nara-busted-for-graffiti-in-manhattan/

An internationally famous japanese pop artist , Yoshitaro Nara, was arrested at 3 am for graffiti in a subway station in Manhattan.   He has an art show going on concurrently! 

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http://www.reversibledestiny.org/home.php

Another project by the artist arakawa.   The idea is to make the design extremely challenging and uncomfortable, and that this stress will allow the occupant to “reverse destiny”  and live forever.   This is somewhat popular in Japan, where wealthy people have bought apartments designed under this conceptual framework.  Some report that they feel younger.   …….

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http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123785033607519075.html#project%3DSLIDESHOW08%26s%3DSB123784371903417881%257Csection%253DUS%26articleTabs%3Darticle

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“Arakawa and Madeline Gins’s quest to make human beings immortal is at risk of dying. That’s because the couple lost their life savings with Bernard Madoff, the mastermind of a multibillion-dollar fraud. Of all the dreams that were crushed by Mr. Madoff’s crime, perhaps none was more unusual than this duo’s of achieving everlasting life through architecture. Mr. Arakawa (he uses only his last name) and Ms. Gins design structures they say can enable inhabitants to “counteract the usual human destiny of having to die.”

The income from their investments with Mr. Madoff helped fund their research and experimental work. Now, Mr. Arakawa, 72 years old, and Ms. Gins, 67, are strapped for cash. They closed their Manhattan office and laid off five employees. The pair’s work, based loosely on a movement known as “transhumanism,” is premised on the idea that people degenerate and die in part because they live in spaces that are too comfortable. The artists’ solution: construct abodes that leave people disoriented, challenged and feeling anything but comfortable.They build buildings with no doors inside. They place rooms far apart. They put windows near the ceiling or near the floor. Between rooms are sloping, bumpy moonscape-like floors designed to throw occupants off balance.

(cbc) – so if you are an architecture student and you’re having a bad jury or crit just adopt Arakawa’s argument  “I’m making it really ugly and jarring because this approach can make the occupants immortal!”  

On the other hand, the RUSSIAN FORMALISTS (Viktor Schlovsky)  had a dictum “make the object strange” that they used as a definition for art.   The idea being that a displacement from the everyday “sleep” of the conventional world is necessary to have an aesthetic experience.